Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Public Health Ontario > Home > Browse By Topic > Health Promotion > Parental Support for Child Health
Parental Support for Child Health
Want to reproduce or adapt resources on this page? Please complete the Request for Permission to Reproduce/Adapt PHO Materials Form, and send to communications@oahpp.ca.    

For more information please see the PHO Website Terms of Use.

Parents play a major role in supporting health behaviours and providing children opportunities for healthy, active living. In Canada, between 1979 and 2004, rates of obesity in children more than doubled.

Physical activity, healthy eating, and reducing recreational screentime are important for promoting and maintaining healthy weights.

These infographics and graphics present results from a telephone survey of 3,206 parents living in Ontario, conducted between February and March, 2015. All results are parent-reported.

The Impact of Different Types of Parental Support Behaviours on Child Physical Activity, Healthy Eating and Screen Time: A Cross-Sectional Study appears in BMC Public Health.

Check out the PHO Grand Rounds presentation from October 2016: From Publication to Practice:Parental Support for Child Physical Activity,Healthy Eating, and Screen Time​ 

 parental support behaviours statistic and imageparent support behaviours statistic and image 

parental support behaviours statistic and imageparental support behaviours statistic and image 
parental support behaviours statistic and imageparental support behaviours statistic and image 
 

 

Physical Activity

 

Individual Graphics

                     
           
References:                        
1. Beets MW, Cardinal BJ, Alderman BL. Parental social support and the physical activity-related behaviors of youth: a review. Health Educ Behav. 2010;37(5):621-44.
2. Janssen I, LeBlanc AG. Systematic review of the health benefits of physical activity and fitness in school-aged children and youth. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010;7(40):1-16. Available from: http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/7/1/40
3. Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Addressing obesity in children and youth: evidence to guide action for Ontario. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2013. Available from: https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/eRepository/Addressing_Obesity_Children_Youth_Sept2013.pdf
4. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. Canadian physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines handbook [Internet]. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology; 2012. Available from: http://www.csep.ca/CMFiles/Guidelines/CSEP_Guidelines_Handbook.pdf                       
5. Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention, Public Health Agency of Canada. Chronic Disease and Injury Indicator Framework: Quick Stats, 2015 Edition. Ottawa, Ontario: Public Health Agency of Canada; 2015. 
6. Kimm SY, Glynn NW, Kriska AM, Barton BA, Kronsberg SS, Daniels SR, et al. Decline in physical activity in black girls and white girls during adolescence. N Engl J Med. 2002;347(10):709-15. Available from: http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa003277
7. Cleland V, Crawford D, Baur LA, Hume C, Timperio A, Salmon J. A prospective examination of children's time spent outdoors, objectively measured physical activity and overweight. Int J Obes. 2008;32(11):1685-93.
8. Brockman R, Jago R, Fox KR. Children’s active play: self-reported motivators, barriers and facilitators. BMC Public Health 2011;11:461. Available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/11/461                 
       

Healthy Eating

 

Individual Graphics

         
 
   
References:                        
1. Beets MW, Cardinal BJ, Alderman BL. Parental social support and the physical activity-related behaviors of youth: a review. Health Educ Behav. 2010;37(5):621-44.
2. Ness AR, Powles JW. Fruit and vegetables, and cardiovascular disease: a review. Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26(1):1-13. Available from: http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/1/1.long
3. Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Addressing obesity in children and youth: evidence to guide action for Ontario. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2013. Available from: https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/eRepository/Addressing_Obesity_Children_Youth_Sept2013.pdf
4. Health Canada. Eating well with Canada's food guide [Internet]. Ottawa, ON: Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada; 2011. Available from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/index-eng.php
5. Birch L, Savage JS, Ventura A. Influences on the development of children's eating behaviours: from infancy to adolescence. Can J Diet Pract Res. 2007;68(1):s1-s56. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2678872/
6. Patrick H, Nicklas TA. A review of family and social determinants of children’s eating patterns and diet quality. J Am Coll Nutr. 2005;24(2):83-92. 7. Coon KA, Goldberg J, Rogers BL, Tucker KL. Relationships between use of television during meals and children's food consumption patterns. Pediatrics. 2001;107(1):E7.​
 

Screen Time

 

Individual Graphics

         
         
 
References:
1. Beets MW, Cardinal BJ, Alderman BL. Parental social support and the physical activity-related behaviors of youth: a review. Health Educ Behav. 2010;37(5):621-44.
2. Tremblay MS, LeBlanc AG, Kho ME, Saunders TJ, Larouche R, Colley RC, et al. Systematic review of sedentary behaviour and health indicators in school-aged children and youth. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8(1):98. Available from: http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/8/1/98
3. Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Addressing obesity in children and youth: evidence to guide action for Ontario. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2013. Available from: https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/eRepository/Addressing_Obesity_Children_Youth_Sept2013.pdf
4. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. Canadian physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines handbook [Internet]. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology; 2012. Available from: http://www.csep.ca/CMFiles/Guidelines/CSEP_Guidelines_Handbook.pdf
5. Van Zutphen M, Bell AC, Kremer PJ, Swinburn BA. Association between the family environment and television viewing in Australian children. J Paediatr Child Health. 2007;43(6):458-63.
6. Bleakley A, Jordan AB, Hennessy M. The relationship between parents' and children's television viewing. Pediatrics. 2013;132(2):e364-71.
7. Shannon CS. Parents' messages about the role of extracurricular and unstructured leisure activities: adolescents' perceptions. J Leisure Res. 2006;38(3):398.

​​​​​​

 


How to cite the infographics

 

To cite an individual infographic:
Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario), Pyper E, Harrington DW, Manson HM. << insert title of infographic>>. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2015. Available from: http://www.publichealthontario.ca/ParentalSupport

To cite the set of infographics:
Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario), Pyper E, Harrington DW, Manson HM. Parental Support for Child Health. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2015. Available from: http://www.publichealthontario.ca/ParentalSupport

Uncontrolled print copy. Valid only on day of Print: [date]
Page updated on [date/time] 28/10/2016 5:23 PM
© , Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion