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Gonorrhea 
 
 
 
 

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Communicable Disease, Emergency Preparedness and Response (CDEPR) cd@oahpp.ca

 

 

Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacteria that cause gonococcal infections, can infect any mucous membrane in the body, including the urethra, cervix, vagina, oropharynx, rectum and conjunctiva. Gonorrhea can be transmitted via anal, oral and vaginal intercourse as well as from mother to child during birth.

Gonorrhea can be prevented through condom use and can be treated with antibiotics. Over the last several decades Gonorrhea has become resistant to an increasing number of antibiotics  including oral cefixime that has been the mainstay of treatment over the last number of years. In an effort to address the growing problem of multi-drug resistant gonorrhea and reduce the risk of long-term consequences associated with gonorrhea, Public Health Ontario, released Ontario-specific Guidelines for Testing and Treatment of Gonorrhea in Ontario in 2013.

Data & Analytics

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Reportable Disease Trends in Ontario

Ontario Burden of Infectious Disease Study

Infectious Disease in Focus – Gonorrhea

Related Links

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MINISTRY OF HEALTH AND
LONG-TERM CARE

Gonorrhea fact sheet

Infectious Diseases Protocol

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION (CDC)

Gonorrhea fact sheet

PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCY OF CANADA

Canadian Guidelines on Sexually Transmitted Infections
(FOR REFERENCE ONLY: Ontario clinicians should refer to the Ontario guidelines located under Resources on this page).

Page last reviewed:  
Page last updated: 09/11/2017 12:36 PM
Uncontrolled print copy. Valid only on day of Print: [date]
Page updated on [date/time] 09/11/2017 12:36 PM
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