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​The Ontario Health Profile

 

The Ontario Health Profile (OHP) describes the health status of Ontarians by focusing on key public health issues that have an impact on the whole of the population.

 

In a series of stories using current data and visuals, the OHP presents an overview of the complex factors that influence and shape Ontario’s population health status.

 

The OHP expands our understanding of the health of Ontarians and gives decision-makers and practitioners the information they need to take action. Each story includes three products: an infographic, an interactive web report, and data tables at both the provincial and public health unit level.

2016

Extreme Weather

Ontarians trust that health care facilities are clean and safe places that will help them get better when they are sick. Yet some people acquire health care-associated infections (HAIs) that can cause illness, complications or even death. Prevention and control of these infections in hospitals, long-term care homes and clinics is key to keeping patients safe.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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2015

Extreme Weather

Extreme weather – weather events that are exceptional in terms of frequency or impact – can have outcomes that impact health through direct and indirect effects, including social and economic disruptions. A changing climate means more extreme weather events, increasing risk to the health of Ontarians.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Measles

Measles has been eliminated in the Americas, including Ontario – but some Ontarians are still at risk of catching the disease. If the province is to remain free of one of the world’s most contagious diseases, we need to be vigilant. Ontario falls just short of the level needed to stop the spread of measles.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Mental Health

Differences in the demographics of Ontario’s population are known to impact health. These determinants
of health play a key role in the health status of the population as a whole – understanding them and how they have changed over time can help to meet the health needs of Ontarians.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Antimicrobial Resistance
 

Antimicrobial resistance is an increasingly serious health issue in Ontario and worldwide. As more antimicrobial drugs become ineffective and fail to treat a growing number of infections, those infections persist and increase the risk of disease, poor health and death. Action is required to ensure the use of antimicrobials only when necessary to safeguard the availability of future treatments for both common and serious infections.

 
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First Five Years
                         

A child’s first five years strongly influence health across the life course. Some children, due to socioeconomic, environmental and biological factors, experience vulnerabilities in early childhood
growth and development, leaving them at a disadvantage.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Mental Health

Mental health and mental illness – distinct but related concepts – are critically important to the health of Ontarians. The burden of poor mental health and mental illness begins in childhood and affects health across the life course.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Radon

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas found in soil, water and outdoor air, and can enter buildings and accumulate in indoor air. Classified as a carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, radon is one of the leading causes of lung cancer. Reducing exposure to indoor radon would result in fewer lung cancers in Ontario.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Antimicrobial Resistance
 

Concentrations of air pollutants are higher on and near major roads and highways. As many Ontarians spend time close to major roadways, they are at risk of increased exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and its associated health impacts.
Better understanding of population-level TRAP exposure can focus efforts on reducing the specific health burden due to this issue.

 
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Foodborne Illness

The burden of foodborne illness is estimated to be substantial. Although self-limited in most instances, serious health effects or death may occur. Determining the true impact foodborne illness has on Ontario is difficult as it is underreported.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Mental Health

A substantial proportion of the Ontario population – both adults and children – is obese, and an even greater proportion is overweight. This is a result of several decades of increase and cannot be attributed to just one cause. Obesity is a complex issue with a negative impact on the health and quality of life of Ontarians.

Infographic

Interactive web report
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Respiratory Viruses

While influenza remains a significant threat to the health of Ontarians, a number of other respiratory viruses cause disease and illness throughout the year. Understanding respiratory viruses that pose a health threat allows for better clinical and public health management.

Download infographic

Interactive web report
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Road Safety

Road safety is one of the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century. Continued effort to identify and address the factors that contribute to collisions is important to improving safety for all road users.

Infographic

Interactive web report

​​​​​​​​​​How to cite the infographics

To cite an individual infographic:
Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). << insert title of infographic>>. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2014.
e.g., Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Radon risks and realities. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2014.

To cite the set of infographics:
Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Ontario Health Profile Infographics. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2014.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disclaimer
This document was developed by Public Health Ontario (PHO). PHO provides scientific and technical advice to Ontario’s government, public health organizations and health care providers. PHO’s work is guided by the current best available evidence.
PHO assumes no responsibility for the results of the use of this document by anyone. This document may be reproduced without permission for non-commercial purposes only and provided that appropriate credit is given to Public Health Ontario. No changes and/or modifications may be made to this document without explicit written permission from Public Health Ontario.
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Uncontrolled print copy. Valid only on day of Print: [date]
Page updated on [date/time] 28/03/2016 5:01 PM
© , Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion