Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

Why working at PHO is important to me:

"Working at PHO is important to me because it enables me to have an impact on the health of people in Ontario."

Natasha Crowcroft, Chief, Applied Immunization Research and Evaluation
New: Scientist Profile
 
 
 Watch Dr. Natasha Crowcroft talk about:
  • What excites her about her work
  • The impact of her research
  • Why she chose PHO

Trouble viewing? Watch on YouTube.

     

    Appointments

    Academic degrees and accreditations

    • Doctor of medicine, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge
    • Master of science, Department of Public Health Sciences, St. Georges Hospital Medical School, University of London
    • Bachelor of medicine and Bachelor of surgery, United Medical Schools of Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, University of London

    Areas of expertise

    • Vaccination programs and vaccine-preventable diseases
    • Immunization
    • Vaccination coverage
    • Encephalitis
    • Surveillance

    PHO research interests

    • Epidemiological studies and methodological development designed to answer applied public health questions for decision-makers.
    • Immunization and vaccine-preventable disease research with the objective to inform local and national policy.
    • The impact of infectious diseases and the impact interventions to prevent and control infectious diseases.

    Current PHO research activities

    • Canadian Immunization Research Network (CIRN) studies including:
      • Provincial Collaborative Network on Pertussis Vaccine Effectiveness
      • Pertussis household immunology study
      • Measles sero-epidemiology (iCARE).
    • PHO-funded studies including:
      • Varicella susceptibility in Ontario
      • The burden and basic reproduction number of measles
      • The cost-effectiveness of public health response to measles outbreaks
      • The positive predictive value of measles IgM results in elimination settings.

    Top publications

    1. Schwartz KL, Kwong JC, Deeks SL, Campitelli MA, Jamieson FB, Marchand-Austin A, Stukel TA, Rosella L, Daneman N, Bolotin S, Drews SJ, Rilkoff H, Crowcroft NS. Effectiveness of pertussis vaccination and duration of immunity. CMAJ. 2016;188(16):E399-406.

    2. Crowcroft NS, Booy R, Harrison T, Spicer L, Britto J, Mok Q, Heath P, Murdoch I, Zambon M, George R, Miller E. Severe and unrecognised: pertussis in UK infants. Arch Dis Child. 2003;88(9):802-6. Erratum in: Arch Dis Child. 2006;91(5):453.

    3. Crowcroft NS, Stein C, Duclos P, Birmingham M. How best to estimate the global burden of pertussis? Lancet Infect Dis. 2003;3(7):413-8.

    4. Granerod J, Ambrose HE, Davies NW, Clewley JP, Walsh AL, Morgan D, Cunningham R, Zuckerman M, Mutton KJ, Solomon T, Ward KN, Lunn MP, Irani SR, Vincent A, Brown DW, Crowcroft NS; UK Health Protection Agency (HPA) Aetiology of Encephalitis Study Group. Causes of encephalitis and differences in their clinical presentations in England: a multicentre, population-based prospective study. Lancet Infect Dis. 2010;10(12):835-44. Erratum in: Lancet Infect Dis. 2011;11(2):79.

    5. Skowronski DM, De Serres G, Crowcroft NS, Janjua NZ, Boulianne N, Hottes TS, Rosella LC, Dickinson JA, Gilca R, Sethi P, Ouhoummane N, Willison DJ, Rouleau I, Petric M, Fonseca K, Drews SJ, Rebbapragada A, Charest H, Hamelin ME, Boivin G, Gardy JL, Li Y, Kwindt TL, Patrick DM, Brunham RC; Canadian SAVOIR Team. Association between the 2008-09 seasonal influenza vaccine and pandemic H1N1 illness during spring-summer 2009: four observational studies from Canada. PLoS Med. 2010;7(4):e1000258.

    View more researchers »

    Page last reviewed:  
    Page last updated: 2017-08-18 11:07 AM
    Uncontrolled print copy. Valid only on day of Print: [date]
    Page updated on [date/time] 2017-08-18 11:07 AM
    © , Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion