Hepatitis B (Acute)

Acute hepatitis B is an infection that attacks the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus and is transmitted through contact with the blood or other bodily fluids of an infected person, including through sexual contact, sharing needles or from mother to baby at birth. An acute infection occurs within the first six months after exposure to the virus. Some people may have a mild illness with few or no symptoms, while others have more serious illness requiring hospitalization or even resulting in death. Most healthy adults can get rid of the virus on their own without treatment. Chronic hepatitis B occurs when the acute infection has lasted for more than six months. Hepatitis B can be prevented through vaccination – offered in grade seven and to those at high risk of infection.

 

Event

PHO Rounds: International Border Surveillance Study

Arriving international passengers at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport were enrolled in a prospective study of COVID-19 risk upon arrival and during quarantine in September and October 2020.  

See the Event Details
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Communicable Diseases

cd@oahpp.ca

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Laboratory Services

customerservicecentre@oahpp.ca

Updated 22 Oct 2019